branding – Aspect Copywriting

What exactly makes a good strapline, slogan or name?

What exactly makes a good strapline, slogan or name?

They must:

  • Be memorable
  • Be easy to pronounce
  • Stand out among your competitors
  • Have global appeal
  • Be acceptable across cultures

A good brand naming copywriter will consider all of the above, while coming up with a name that – in this digital age – would work well as a URL. This is extremely important. Along with the fact that your name or strapline can’t already exist, nor can anything too similar.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t be creative. You just might require a bit of assistance so that the words that represent your brand best carry through the message of what you do, along with your mission.

What’s good for one company, may be bad for another. A branding copywriter must consider what the brand identity naming elements should include.

For instance, if a name should explicitly mention what they do or not. Or how to incorporate company values in a name or strapline. Or what type of name to use.

As an example, you could name your company after you, simply by using your first name and surname. John Lewis is the perfect example of a reputable brand with a simple yet memorable name.

You could also use a descriptive name such as my own. Copywriting describes what I do, and Aspect describes how I assist in forming your brand image by using words that will make your target audience look at your brand from an angle that will make them want to invest.

Hence my strapline: taking your brand in the right direction (this is an example of how a good, long-lasting corporate strapline will marry with your name).

Another option is using a relevant object to come up with a creative name. The infamous Coca-Cola name was born from the coca leaves & kola nuts used as ingredients in the drink.

You could also choose initials and abbreviations. H&M and Asda are proof of this. Their names are shortened forms of Hennes and Mauritz & Asquith and Dairies. And UPS is an initialised version of the lengthy United Parcel Service of America, inc.

Somehow, I don’t think the non-abbreviated version of any of these would work well as a URL.

Blog writing

Effective Copywriting: Selling The Outcome

Effective Copywriting: Selling The Outcome

Effective copywriting doesn’t describe a service, product or brand. It sells the outcome: what your target audience can get from it.

When someone searches on the web for a travel agency, they already know that they’re going to visit the web page of a travel agency. Therefore, ‘Established in 1982, [Company name] is a travel agency that prides itself on…’ tells the website user nothing new. They are wasted, empty words and make the process from marketing something to selling it much longer.

Good copywriting endorses a product or service by highlighting what benefits the market will receive from buying into it. It doesn’t tell, it shows what the product means for the customer.

The travel agency would be better off sharing the impressive number hotels in their portfolio and the USPs of the travel & hotel experiences they offer. Good copy involves facts that the target audience otherwise wouldn’t have known about, and it excludes many of the obvious details.

Excellent copy sets the brand apart, and emphasises why it’s the best choice without uttering the words ‘best choice’.

Families don’t want a builder, they want a sturdy, well-built, well-integrated extension.

Businesses don’t want a copywriter, they want to transform their website to increase conversion rates.

That old sweet shop down the road doesn’t sell sweets. It sells traditional sweets that have delighted generations.

By putting this concept into practice while creating content, your target audience will know much sooner that their needs can be met. This in turn makes the sale happen much quicker. Everyone wins.

copywriting style guides

The Importance Of Standing For Something: Company Values For Better Copywriting

The Importance Of Standing For Something: Company Values For Better Copywriting

If you don’t stand for something, how can anyone respect what you do? – Miranda Lambert

It’s obvious. When we buy into a product or a service, we are choosing one company over its competitors. In doing that, we are expressing our identities by portraying some aspect of what we stand for, and that is because the company is saying something that sits nicely with how we think.

This is the importance of standing for something as a company: having values, a mission, clear company identity, and communicating this all well so it can appeal to potential customers.

And that’s why it’s vital to have a seamless brand voice that’s described in a style guide to create a company personality that consumers relate to.

Company values can be communicated implicitly through what you say and how you say it, or explicitly through your content and tagline.

For instance, a travel photographer might believe they are on a journey to share images of today that will last generations. As a result, their choice of language for their website may be warm, friendly and full of sentimental phrases.

The same person may also express their values through the slogan, “Images For The Ages.”

In thinking about what your business stands for, what you care about should be obvious if you’re an established company.

There’s no use trying to come up with it out of nowhere because, trust me, it will show. That’s why so many company’s have such vague values which are displayed through taglines such as “building relationships that last.” This doesn’t sound like a cliché for no reason.

You’ll hear me talk a lot about empty words, and that’s because it’s what I find often separates plain business writing from copywriting.

If a company doesn’t consider what they can offer from the perspective of a consumer – what sets them apart from other businesses in their field – then their content will not set them apart.

Personality is a big part of identity, and values can be expressed through personality. And in marketing, personality is power. It’s how market leaders get ahead of their game.